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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 396 (some duplicates have been removed)
is the assistant attorney general of the civil rights division in washington, dc, he was nominated for that position by president obama and sworn in in october of 2009 and we are all the lucky -- we are all very lucky that that happened in october of 2009. tom has spent his entire career in public service and on protecting the civil rights of our most vulnerable people. tom actually joined the civil rights division as a young lawyer and while he was there he prosecuted some of the most significant cases in the country. lawyers in the civil rights division get fanned out to places in the country to handle cases in mississippi and alabama and california and all over and tom was one of those people. he was sent to texas to handle a very significant hate crime case when he was a young lawyer that involved a gang of white supremacists that went on a killing spree and ended up shooting 3 people and killing one when he was a young lawyer working in the civil rights division. he later served as a top deputy for attorney general janet reno, he was special counsel to ted kennedy and ser
an incomplete picture of african-american emancipation and the struggle for civil rights that followed. professor happ was interviewed at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. part of book tv's college series. >> host: university of pennsylvania history professor, stephen hahn is the author of this book "the political world of slavery and freedom." professor hahn, before we get into the subject of the book, what's the image on the front cover? >> guest: that's a very good question and the answer is i have no idea. the editor proposed -- thought it was a very eye-catching image and when i showed it to friends and colleagues they had no idea what it meant. it doesn't clearly relate to anything in the book but i think they were interested in selling books, and that's how they chose it. i think it is a really interesting photograph, and i think it speaks to sort of complex connections within african-american communities that involve gender as well as power. but beyond that, i don't know. >> host: well, professor hahn, what do going to the topic of the book -- what do we know wron
on after words clayborne carson recalls his journey as a civil rights activist participating in the 1963 march on washington through prominent historian and martin luther king jr.'s papers. >> up next on booktv after words with guest host authors and play right janet langhart cohen. this week is dorian clayborne carson and "martin's dream" my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr.. in it he recalls his journey from teenage civil rights activist to his presence at the 1963 march on -- he includes encounters with the many leaders and organizers in the civil rights movement including stokely carmichael and the king family. it's about an hour. >> host: dr. carson thanks for joining me on after words. >> guest: it's my pleasure. >> host: your book, "martin's dream" is a memoir and a history book. in the book you talk about your personal journey and you are very candid about your life and you also cover new insights as a historian to the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr.. what prompted you to write the book this way? >> guest: well, i wanted to write about the martin lut
often stood by and refused to enforce new civil rights laws. now, some conservative sheriffs say they'll refuse to enforce new gun control laws from washington because they may consider them unconstitutional. today's conservatives aren't opposing the right of our children to go to school. but they are standing in the way of our children going to school safely. that's why president obama is proposing these strong, common sense solutions to gun violence. >> that most fundamental set of rights to life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness. fundamental rights that were denied to college stunts dents virginia tech and elementary school students in newtown and kids on street corners in chicago. those rights are at stake. we're responsible. >> we're all responsible for protecting our children and that's why change is going to happen. all that talk about states' rights couldn't stop progress 50 years ago. and he must make sure it doesn't stop progress today. joining me now is co-host of "the psych" here on msnbc. and chief for "mother jones" and an msnbc analyst. thank you both for joining
and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with th
students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil right
and surely passing civil rights legislation and defeating the nazis was much more formidable than taking on the gun lobby. >> jon: and america's great debate giving the topic a lot of attention. but is the dehe bait one-sided. >> i've seen the most beautiful girl i've ever met. she was just that person that i turn to. >> jon: a tear jerking story that got big attention in the media. even more when it turned out to be a hoax. how did reporters miss this one? "the washington post" makes news caught in another plagerism scandal. mr. obama holds the last news conference of his first term and takes a shot at the media for the anger in washington and on the topic of doping, lance comes clean on oprah, will it help his cause or her floundering career? >> here we are in austin, texas. >> jon: on the panel, writer and fox news contributor, judy miller, and jim pinkerton and cal thomas and kirsten powers, i'm jon scott, fox news watch is on right now. >> this will be difficult. there will be pundits and politicians and special interest public lobbyists, publicly warning of a tyrannical all-out ass
to that. and it is about state leadership, not just looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point o
involved in civil rights activity. what was going on at the time and how did howard find himself in the middle of a lot of civil-rights politics? >> guest: in atlanta, and even though atlantis is seen certainly today as one of the less racist spots in the son of, in fact it was almost totally segregated when he arrived. but, by the way, he made sure that people never thought that he took a job that an all-black women's college because he was committed to the black struggle. we're talking about 1956 when the black struggle was just beginning. and though howard did care about black rights, he was not yet an activist on behalf of those rights. but in fairly short order he and his wife became very active. i mean, his students, the first white women came of little bit after howard's arrival and even then very few. dion, black women, many of whom have been brought up in rural areas, they were slightly stunned at this white teacher. there were few other white members, but howard was a genius of -- teacher. very informal, very easygoing. he prided himself on being good at conversation an
in the civil rights movement. also with us the top aide to lyndon johnson back when he passed all that civil rights legislation. james peterson from lehigh university. i should also note that mr. califono is a member of the cbs corporate board. the only other member of the board to appear on face the nation i believe is walter cronkite. >> good company schieffer: after he left the anchor chair. let me start with you joe. you know, as we look out on washington it's divided as it is, and these problems that are dividing us. it occurs to me over and over the nation is is not nearly as divided as it was over segregation and it's not nearly as difficult, in my mind, to solve some of these problems as it was for lyndon johnson to get those civil rights bills through the senate. how did he do it? >> i mean, i think one i agree with you incidentally. i think that the tension the fact that the southern democrats controlled the senate and they control the committees in the house not only on civil rights but on virtually everything we were trying to do in the great society on spending, on those bills,
has been tried in court. is a civil rights statute. -- it is a civil rights statute. they can be a perfectly legitimate plaintiffs to bring a lawsuit, and there are a number of people who belong to disability organizations that actually, that is what their livelihood is, bringing these lawsuits. the gentleman over here, who was also a lawyer knows of at least one case involving two lawsuits. they started all neighborhoods. the target places like san francisco because this is an old city with old buildings, virtually none of which comply. we only have new construction that would be billed to 1988 compliance standards, usually. whatever kind of business you have, the building part does not enforce ada compliance. you have your architect look at the ada if you are going to make a major revision anyway. is very expensive to do that. the demand letter is a requirment for the state -- is a requirement for the state laws to be brought. for civil rights cases, you are expected to know the law and be in compliance. they do not make a demand under federal law saying they should ask you
their children watching on. his actions in 2004 thrust this civil rights issue into the national spotlight and cemented his reputation as a fearless public officials who does what he thinks is right. under mayor newsom's energetic leadership the economy grew and the city became an economic center for biotech and clean tech. gach newsom has been a trail blaitzer on combating homelessness and protecting the government. in 2007 he was re-elected as mayor with more than 70 percent of the vote, which is unheard of. please welcome our lieutenant governor, gavin newsom. >> my role was to get tom to speak. i'm just going to jump in because i want to keep you all on time. you've got an agenda packet and i'm going to be held accountable if you don't meet it. roslyn, let's pick up on tom's passion. he told me a couple points that are important, that is the consciousness awareness, this growing consciousness around bullying. and it's a question i guess that requires, has bullying gotten worse or have we gotten better to begin to recognize it? >> hard to know. tom and the president refer to as
conversation with a civil rights icon in her own right, coretta scott king. back in 2005, we traveled to atlanta for a very special program with miss king at the famed ebenezer baptist church, the church that was home base for dr. king during much of the civil rights movement. a conversation which would turn out to be one of her last on national television. we're glad you could join us to wrap up this 10th anniversary week with a conversation with coretta scott king, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we kick off our second season in 2005, we could think of no better way to celebrate than by paying a visit to coretta scott king at atlanta's iconic e
was a journalist who stood up for civil rights and help changed the south. remembering eugene patterson. next. >> jeff: the family of internet activist ar won swartz is blaming zellous-- for his death. he could founded the web site reddit committed suicide on frichlt he was facing federal childs claiming he stole documents from an attempt to make them freely available on-line. the nation has lost one of its most famous journalists eugene paterson. an acclaimed newspaper editor paterson was also a civil rights crusader. he died last night in florida at age 8 --. we get more now from magalie laguerre wilkinson. >> reporter: best known for his sharp editorials. they took on the vietnam war and president nixon. but they were most critical of his fellow white southerners who saw the segregated south as the only way of life. patterson's most famous column as editor of the atlanta journal constitution was titled a flower for the grave. he wrote it in reaction to the 19634-- 1963 church bopping that killed four little girls in birmingham, alabama. only we can trails the truth southerner, you and i. w
, martin luther king the third went to the ceremony. the civil rights legend is honored with a national holiday monday. the president plans to pay tribute to king by using a bible owned by the civil rights leader as he takes the public oathth of office. stay with fox 5 for all the latest on the inauguration from ceremonies to the parade. we have everything you need to know if you are heading downtown. it's on air or online at myfoxdc.com. we will be on the air tomorrow at 4:00 a.m. >>> coming up, getting ready for the inaugural parade. the floats are lining up. we got a preview coming up.  >>> several floats are preparing to make their debut down pennsylvania avenue. lauren demarco has more. >> reporter: the floats have arrived. they will stay on c street overnight until they are ready to make their debut along pennsylvania avenue. four of the eight official inaugural parade floats represent the states where the president and vice president were born as well as where they served as lawmakers. >> we have the our people are future floats, the theme of the 57th inaugural committee. it
people that he wrote the text after the passage of the '64 civil rights act. the two acts that we think within the civil rights agenda, at that moment, king, himself, only felt that he was half there. maybe a third of the way to wra wra wards the goal. >> there's no question about that, e.j. but when you look at the fact that there was record numbers of turn outs of voters. the people got it. a lot of people had been out cast. and a lot of people that never had any concrete addressing of their needs. when you deal with unploimt insurance and you deal with pell grants. these are both on the right and the left. but it meant a lot to people which is why people made sure they reelected him, e.j. >> there are two things, one is just as you say, the turnout was extraordinary. and you had a real test in this solution. yes, president obama was well-funded, but you had enormous sums on the other side trying to beat him. in democracy, showing no matter how poor you are, your vote counts equally with a wealthy guy down the streelt. and the one thing that can beat big money is numbers. people did i
. it was a real kind an effort -- pioneering efforts. >> and ending run by the civil rights movement instead of the kkk. one of the first voice is heard after was medgar evers, who was in the assassinated outside his home, the great civil-rights leader. interestingly on monday, for president obama's inauguration, it is medgar evers' widow who will be giving the convocation. >> we begin today's show with more on the debt and prosecution of internet freedom activist aaron swartz who killed themselves last friday. at the time of his death, he was facing up to 35 years in prison and a $1 million fine for using computers at mit to download millions of academic articles provided by the nonprofit research service jstor. he was 26 years old. at the age of 14, he co developed really simple syndication, rss. it is the key component of much of the web's entire publishing infrastructure. by the time is 19, he co-founded a company that would merge with reddit, now one of the country's most popular websites. he also helped develop the architecture for the creed of commons licensing system and built the op
. he also reminds us of our history. there has been no civil rights or human rights movement in which the faith communities and its leaders have not been at the forefront and i look at dr. and he is a living reminder of that truth. at the heart of civil rights movement in the years 1963 and 1964 before there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun out of control, and we did. for almost a quarter of a century we have opened our congregation doors, fed and provided a warm and safe place for homeless men to
aviators in world war ii. a civil rights theme running throughout this parade. other floats dedicated to martin luther king, jr. and civil rights movement, president and vice president's home states and take a look at this over here, nasa will be a part of the parade as well. here is an exact replica of the mars curiosity rover. it will be rolling down pennsylvania avenue just behind the president and the rest of the parade floats in tomorrow's inaugural parade. we'll have a unique perspective on all of this tomorrow, john. we will be on the back, when i say we, me, my producer and photographer, on the back of a flatbed truck just in front of the president's motorcade as it's rolling down pennsylvania avenue towards the white house and presidential reviewing stand where the president will hop off, go inside the white house and come back out and watch the parade take place. it's going to be a sight to watch because of so much work and preparation that's gone into this parade and just to give you a sense of how much preparation, we talked to the folks at hargrove, a little company here
civil rights. today, there are 29 states where it is legal to fire someone based on sexual identity and 34 states it is legal to fire someone for being transgender. there are only 20 states, only 20, that have laws explicitly prohibiting housing discrimination against them. there is so much work to be done. with me is matthew green, editor and chief of "the advocate." i love that cover. and the founding executive director of the national center for transgender equality. it's good to have you here. >> thank you. >> president obama spent much of the first two years undoing the clinton years. don't ask and don't tell. it was a part of the democratic move to the right. how do we say good job there and lay out a new agenda on the questions going forward? >> you know, excuse me, his statements on same-sex marriage have had global resonance. around the world, around the country, people have been galvanized in favor of recognizing the rights of lgbt americans. there are a few things we can look at that are specific to the presidency. there are a few broader things we want to look at in term
was not so much about lgbt rights, though that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, t
like yeager for being passionate because guns are the civil rights victims of our time. it's no coincidence that most of them are black. [ laughter ] and that i get nasty looks when i sit down with one at a lunch counter. [ laughter ] and i'm not the only one who thinks so. standing with me is larry ward founder of the first-ever gun appreciation day, which happens to be this saturday, the same weekend as martin luther king day. and that's no coincidence. >> i believe that gun appreciation day honors the legacy of dr. king. i think martin luther king would agree with me if he were alive today. >> stephen: yes, dr. king would be pro-gun just as surely as jesus would be pro-nail. [ laughter ] because like mr. ward, dr. king understood that the root of all oppression is lack of firepower. [ laughter ] >> if african-americans had been given the right to keep and bear arms from day one of the country's founding, perhaps slavery might not have been a chapter in our history. [ laughter ] >> stephen: yes! if only america's founders had turned to the people they owned and chained in
, the nuge has long been an inspiration for the civil rights movement. in the words of the old negro spiritual, "free at last, free at last, wango tango! i'm free at last." we'll be right back. 2i-ppa @, @[cheers and ap] >> stephen: welcome back, everybody. thank you for rejoining our broadcast already in progress. nation, longtime viewers know i love my sponsors like i love my children-- if my children gave me money. whraf laugh. [ laughter ] that's why i leap, like a mother tigress, to their defense if anyone attacks them. i am especially protective of the coca-cola company's whole family of products. although in this family fanta's kinda the black sheep. [ laughter ] why can't you be more like the neighbor's kid, he's a "doctor." [cheers and applause] folks, in this family, i especially love vitaminwater. oh, that reminds me. gotta take my meds. monday. [ laughter ] [cheers and applause] whoo! sadly, as vitaminwater's parent company, coca-cola is now embroiled in a lawsuit for allegedly making "deceptive and unsubstantiated claims" that their product is healthy. just because it ha
provides. we're a civil rights office and civil right laws are not affirmative action laws and they don't say you have to do more for people with disabilities. you have to provide accommodations, particularly if requested, but because we have members who sometimes have participated on the bridge line, we have allowed that. i will get into a little bit of weeds here, we're a passive meeting body. we're not a policy-making body. the city attorney of the berkeley and state- the city of berkeley fought having a bridge line for their disability council and were successful with the state. they said that having a bridge line for council members to vote is a violation of the brown act and that to have a bridge line you have to declare the individual council member's home a meeting place. that anybody from the public could go there as well, which was goofy, but that is the law. but in any case, we have that. other public bodies don't and they don't have to. >> so they are not obligated to have these phones? >> that is correct. they are not obligated to have those phones that. is an extra ben
from california introduced president obama and she used one phrase. my question is, the civil rights movement or the war responsible for the change? host: a couple of headlines. obama aware of second term perils. also from "the arizona republic," how will the president govern across america's to buy. -- divide. from the boston "sunday globe," still talking about change anytime of broken politics. a caller on a republican line. -- our republican line. we will go to a caller from greensboro, mississippi. -- greens go, mississippi. -- greensville, mississippi. caller: i want to say congratulations to the president. host: this part of the white house is closed to vehicular traffic but open to tourists. the blue room is in the center of the white house. that is where the president took his official oath of office as dictated under the constitution. a few blocks away along massachusetts avenue, the vice president took the oath of office at 8:20 this morning. administered by the justice sonia sotomayer. >> i, joseph r. biden jr., do solemnly swear -- [repeats] >> that i will support and def
: civil rights lieders, actor jamie foxx joined in the wreath laying. >> i think it's a great day, an intersection of history where you have the president, who is the first black president, being inaugurated for the second time on dr. king holiday. >> reporter: parents brought their children to be part of it, visitors took pictures to remember this day. gail punch came from dallas, texas, to be here. >> i get medicare, medicaid. i was a precinct chair. i have problems walking, but i wouldn't let nothing stop me. >> reporter: and you don't have to let anything stop you either. even if you don't have a ticket, you can come down to the mall and stand between 4th and 14th streets. this is the kind ever view you would get. there are also wide screen tvs. you might decide the best place to watch it all is right here on tv. that's the latest live from the mall. back to you, jim. >> you have to like crowds, chris. thanks. and streets already being shut down in d.c. tonight. crews put up gates and posted restricted parking signs downtown today. part of pennsylvania avenue is already shut d
an argument that's insane, they jump on the civil rights movement and slavery and try to latch their argument on to the history of african-americans. >> as if they give a damn or be up in front. >> you don't remember ted nugent standing in front of everyone in the civil rights movement? >> i remember him getting out of going to vietnam and being afraid to carry a gun when his country asked him to carry gun in vietnam. he was a coward, and these guys always jump on slavery and the civil rights movement. if slaves hadn't been owned by other people, there wouldn't have been slavery either. >> this is -- what's happening now is something we've been talking about for five years, and that is the extreme right, let's call it what it is, has gone on about barack obama as a socialist, conspiracy theories about secret plans to take guns and dominate the country, and now because biden comes out and talks about high capacity magazines they say finally, we finally, they have something -- >> nailed him. >> to nail on, and they are -- >> i don't want to make fun of these people because 1% of the country, 5%
journey on the road to inclusion. among them, a high school marching band from arkansas and a civil rights pioneer who book end a vivid story of how far this nation has come. the same snaimt same but the little rock high school of 2013 marches to a different drum. the irony will be inescapable when this racially mixed students from little rock's most infamous school perform at the second inauguration of america's first black president. >> we are not just historic because of what happened in 1957. we are great in academics, music, which is why we are going to the inauguration. >> reporter: 1957. before these students and even the president himself were born. little rock central high was not a great place then, but rather the flashpoint in the battle over court-ordered school desegregation, forced by the federal government to accept black students. >> at 8:28 this morning, little rock time, the nine negro students who arrived here at this school daily arrived here again this morning. >> reporter: terrence robert was one of the little rock nine. were you prepared, though, for the anger and vi
claiming that they are the martin luther kings in this civil rights fight. >> if a lot of african-americans back in the '60s had guns and the legal right to use them for self-defense, do you think they would have needed selma? if john lewis had had a gun, would he have been beat upside the head on the bridge? >> i have to tell you -- >> karen, listen, this is disgusting. first of all, it's not original -- >> rush is now -- it sounds like he's trying to be a member of the black panthers. this is ridiculous. >> well, there's that irony as well. but it's not original. he's taking it from the comments from the other right wing nut job who was talking about if slaves had guns. first of all, there are plenty of shotgun owners during the civil rights era, but to reduce john lewis' service to this country and the civil rights movement and the black experience and the overall american experience in this country to him getting beat upside the head is disgusting and offensive. this is a man who served his country through civil rights and through service in the congress. to reduce his life to
swearing is going to happen on the same day that we honor one of america's great civil rights activists, martin luther king jr. we will pause to remember dr. king's birthday and i'd like to bring in andrew young the third, former civil rights leader and ambassador andrew young. good to see you, sir. >> hey, craig, how are you doing? >> great. your father is a long time friend and confidant of reverend king. what have you learned from your father, and also, his generation as well? >> you know, i think that it is very important that we as americans today give each other a faith-saving way out, and that is one thing that my father was adamant about throughout his life is that when you have an opponent and have indifferences about a subject, that you give your opponent a way out. to keep his dignity and that is how you create change, and that is what dr. king and my father and dr. lowrie and others did during the civil rights movement when they were fighting bigotry. and unfortunately, that is what the president obama is going to to have to learn to do with the go gop. >> what are your thou
of the leader of civil rights rights. we will have more on this and the president's inauguration later on abc7 news. >> mike nicco is ahead with the forecast. >> pretty chilly. frost was there but it is less and less likely. more and more likely we will have "spare the air" through the weekend and rough surf at the beach. i will tell you when it will be most dangerous there and how long the warm weather will last. >> the warnings surrounding the surf contest and why it could be best to wash -- watched from asho >> novato, oakland, sunnyvale, and all bay area, this is abc7 news. >> the san francisco 49ers are headed to georgia this afternoon for the championship game of the nfc. one lucky area man is going on the first ever plane ride. the man from bayview district got a call yesterday say he won the road trip sweepstakes scoring two free tickets to the game if atlanta and the first time ever leaving california. he will bring his cousin to the game. their fare, tickets and traps are all on the 49ers' time. >> there is a beach hazard for northern california coast through the weekend including th
of civil rights rights. we will have more on this and the president's inauguration later on abc7 news. >> mike nicco is ahead with the forecast. >> pretty chilly. frost was there but it is less and less likely. more and more likely we will have "spare the air" through the weekend and rough surf at the beach. i will tell you when it will be most dangerous there and how long the warm weather will last. >> the warnings surrounding the surf contest and why it could be best to wash -- watched from ashore. >> rul >> novato, oakland, sunnyvale, and all bay area, this is abc7 news. >> the san francisco 49ers are headed to georgia this afternoon for the championship game of the nfc. one lucky area man is going on the first ever plane ride. the man from bayview district got a call yesterday say he won the road trip sweepstakes scoring two free tickets to the game if atlanta and the first time ever leaving california. he will bring his cousin to the game. their fare, tickets and traps are all on the 49ers' time. >> there is a beach hazard for northern california coast through the weekend includi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 396 (some duplicates have been removed)